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Rich and stubborn

Rich and stubborn


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By Alberto Rabilotta

The underlying problem, the economic implosion that is occurring in several countries, from Greece to Portugal, through Spain and Italy, which affects tens of millions of people who have lost their jobs, sometimes accommodation, who studied and will not have employment or means to live, and that they are losing hope of returning to a normal life, that problem remains whole and it is not discussed in the mainstream media.


Hallelujah, the weekly The Economist, admits that inequality reached a level that can hinder growth (1), a conclusion many reached long ago, as noted by Canadian columnist Carol Goar (Venerable Economist sounds alarm over growing inequality, Toronto Star on October 18).
But that Bible of capitalism from 1843 affirms, without blushing, that history does not provide answers to the current disparities in wealth between that 1.0 percent and 99 percent of the population, a warning intended to justify "changes" that allow maintaining the status quo.

The "answers" the Economist report provides are a salad of common sense measures - claimed without success by economists who
They have some sense of history and they know what the remedy for the Great Depression was - like downsizing the big deposit and investment banks to avoid having to be bailed out at any price in the event of a financial crisis, but in the context the continuation of the policies of structural adjustments, that is, the austerity policies that the rentier oligarchy enforces in practically all the countries of the
"Advanced capitalism".

And also, due to the class instinct that leads him to want to destroy any workers 'organization, The Economist proposes to dismantle the teachers' unions in order to "diversify" education, and incidentally increase the retirement age sharply, which reminds me to former OECD Secretary General Donald Johnston, who at the beginning of this century and in a seminar at the Montreal Conference proposed raising the retirement age of all workers to 70 years, including those working in construction or mining , something that at that moment seemed an exaggeration and that today is becoming a reality in the countries of advanced capitalism.

True, The Economist recognizes that governments should do more for the youth and the poor, and also increase training programs for the unemployed, as well as eliminate some tax advantages that benefit the rich, that is, "finger atole "As Mexicans say, since these" recommendations "are based on the assumption that current governments do not have the resources for massive economic intervention or to dismantle the global monopolies that cause the current situation, and that therefore they must appear as they are doing something, which does not mean that they are doing something, and more importantly, something that is really worthwhile for the people.

Change things so that everything remains the same. So goes the world of advanced capitalism. After the meeting of the heads of government and state of the European Union (EU), this week that ends, in the EU we are witnessing a new wave of optimism because it seems that it was decided to move towards the creation of the banking union that will allow control and recapitalize banks, at least those in the euro zone (ZE).


The underlying problem, the economic implosion that is occurring in several countries, from Greece to Portugal, through Spain and Italy, which affects tens of millions of people who have lost their jobs, sometimes accommodation, who studied and will not have employment or means to live, and that they are losing hope of returning to a normal life, that problem remains whole and it is not discussed in the mainstream media. Nor is any importance given to the rapid increase in separatism or independence in Spain, Belgium and Italy, which largely reveals the depth of this economic, political and social crisis.

In other countries, such as France, Belgium and even Germany, the process of dismantling all wage and labor conquests, for example, is slower but continues, and manifests itself in the growth of unemployment, underemployment, and the impoverishment of broad sectors of the population.

Which brings me to a text by Norman Pollack, writer and history professor at Michigan State University (2), who affirms that in the case of the United States one can already speak of fascism because there is an interpenetration between the government and the large capital, which has created a hierarchical system of social classes, with enormous differences in wealth and power; because this system militarized social values ​​and geopolitical strategy; because it pretends the false ideology of a classless society to instill loyalty to the social order among working people.

The rich are very confused and do not want to hear any reason when it comes to the government meddling in business, even if that intervention to create full employment favors the capitalist class, as the Polish economist Michal Kalecki said in 1942 (3 ).

In pointing out the contradictions and the true class reasons why capitalists, industrialists and financiers, refuse to allow governments to intervene in crisis situations, in that conference on "Political Aspects of Full Employment", Kalecki refers to fascism: One of the important functions of fascism, as typified by the Nazi system, was to eliminate capitalist objections to full employment. As such, under fascism the rejection of government spending policies is outweighed by the fact that the machinery of the state is under the direct control of an association of big business with the business of the fascists. This eliminates the need for the myth of "responsible finance," which served to prevent governments from fighting crises of confidence through spending. In democracy, one cannot know what type the next government will be. Under fascism there is no next government (4).

In the United States, according to Pollack, it does not matter who is elected in the November 6 elections, Romney or Obama, because basically nothing will change, because the oligarchy will remain in government.

The title of the latest book by economist Michael Hudson defines very well the evolution of capitalism and the current situation: “The Road from Industrial
Capitalism to Finance Capitalism and Debt Peonage “. In other words, “the road from industrial capitalism to financial capitalism and slavery by the
debt ”(5).

There is not only a lot to think about, but industrial amounts of reasons to act, as Mafalda would say.

La Vèrdiere, France.

- Alberto Rabilotta is an Argentine-Canadian journalist.

1.- http://www.economist.com/node/21564414
2.- Norman Pollock, is the author of “The Populist Response to Industrial America” and “The Just Polity”. See “Under the Cloak of Liberalism America on the Cusp of Fascism”: http://www.counterpunch.org/2012/10/12/america-on-the-cusp-of-fascism/
3.- http://alainet.org/active/58244&lang=es
4.- Michal Kalecki, Political Aspects of Full Employment (1942) http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/2010/kalecki220510.html
5.- Michael Hudson, http://michael-hudson.com

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Video: The rich boy with the stubborn girl (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Clay

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  2. Mukhtar

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  3. Zion

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  4. Vudozshura

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  5. Zulugal

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